JStor Daily – online magazine

JSTOR, an online for-fee archive of “academic journals, books and primary sources”, has announced the JSTOR Daily  of  featured articles from the collection. This is very eclectic – great way to add interest to the day.

JSTOR, Daily, Inside Higher Ed (Oct 1)

Wanting to make JSTOR’s content a little more digestible and to engage a different kind of audience, the library today is officially launching its new online magazine, JSTOR Daily. The slick-looking home page already features some 100 blog posts and original articles, most of which draw on and link to more expansive content already on JSTOR. Topics vary widely, from a note on the enduring relevance of Herman Melville, for example, to the economic history of tipping. The magazine intends to publish a several blog posts daily, plus at least one longer-form piece each Wednesday.

Google Scholar’s Size

Coming up with an estimate on how many documents are indexed in Google Scholar isn’t easy. One bibliometric team in Spain puts the size at 160 million +/- 10%.

Just how big is Google Scholar? Ummm by Jia You, Science Insider (Sept 30)

… “the researchers report in a study posted to the arXiv preprint server earlier this year and updated this month. The number: 160 million indexed documents (plus or minus 10%), including journal articles, books, case law, and patents.”

Guide to Eurostat

Excellent guide to obtaining international statistics on economic and social activity through Eurostat – describes types of reports, how to search, aspects of the databases.

Eurostat’s Statistical Treasure Trove By Anja Chemnitz Thygesen, Online Searcher (Sep/Oct 2014)

As an excellent entry point to data on European matters, Eurostat (epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu) contains an enormous amount of information and statistics from across the European Union membership countries, plus a few other nations. In this article I use the example of researching the elderly population in the EU to illustrate some of the highlights of the Eurostat pages.

Information Retrieval Techniques

It takes experience and discipline to be skilled researcher. Judith Tinnes, in this article on the art of searching for terrorism literature, presents a very thorough and clear description of the research process and types of online resource and provides sound advice on how to track down the best material. It is the best article I have ever read on information retrieval techniques: It instructs the reader in matters of approach and tools, and includes detail on techniques such as those of snowballing, citation searching, and citation analyses. You don’t need to be researching terrorism literature to benefit from this, but the topic does give it an extra frisson.


The Art of Searching: How to Find Terrorism Literature in the Digital Age
by Judith Tinnes, Perspectives on Terrorism, Vol 7, No 4 (2013)

This guide provides an overview of information retrieval techniques for locating high-quality literature on terrorism and counter-terrorism. Starting from general considerations on conducting a literature search – taking into account the specifics of terrorism studies – instructions are provided on how to find particular literature types by using different search methods and information retrieval systems, followed by information on how to refine a search by employing focused search strategies. The explanations are enriched with numerous links to recommendable resources. The included examples are focused on terrorism studies, but the general search mechanics can be applied to other research domains as well.

Reference Works Online

Reference sources have been moving to online for several years. This article in Online Searcher takes a good hard look at the pros and cons of online reference products. Ease of access has  greatly improved, but authority may not be clear and the online version of a reference work may not be complete.

The Ebb and Flow of Reference Products , By Denise Beaubien Bennett, Online Searcher (July / August 2014)

“Have reference sources eroded in quality in the online era? We’re all aware of the challenges facing us and our users in vetting (or not) the authority and credibility of free sources available online. But the quality of contemporary vetted sources is worth examining in its own right.”

Many excellent online reference works are commented upon in this article.

Riches in the Internet Archive

The Internet Archive is best known for the Wayback Machine to archived web pages but it has much more – books, images, music, and specialized collections.

5 Types Of Free Content Riches You Can Dig Up At The Internet Archive by Jessica Coccimiglio, Make Use Of (Jul 16)

Canadians will be interested in the long list of texts and collections from Canadian schools and associations — Canadian Libraries

Bing, Cortana, and Academic Search

Bing will integrate results from academic sources in the general web search – as explained in Bing & Cortana To Get Academic Search Integration At A Whole New Level by Barry Schwartz, Search Engine Land (Jul 15)

Adding a blow to Google, Microsoft added that “instead of treating scholarly information as a separate search engine – as competitors,” clearly implying Google here. Microsoft Bing will make the academic data as “a first-class citizen in Bing search results.”

Cortana, Microsoft’s personal asistant technology, is the agent. Full description is at Making Cortana the Researcher’s Dream Assistant, Inside Microsoft Research.

That’s great – but is Bing adding records to its Academic Search?

Digital Commons Network for free, scholarly articles

Those seeking grey literature or scholarly will want to explore the Digital Commons Network of free, full-text scholarly works.  These are sourced from 330 universities and colleges worldwide (although most are in the United States) and curated by the university librarians. Among Canadian universities I noted McMaster University, Wilfrid Laurier, University of Windsor, University of Western Ontario, and Osgoode Hall Law School of York University. There are surely more.

Digital Commons holds “peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, dissertations, working papers, conference proceedings, and other original scholarly work.”

The site opens to a multicoloured wheel for visually exploring the disciplines. Continue browsing by spinning the wheel. You may also click on an academic discipline and begin to narrow by journal, author, or keyword search.

Search wheel for exploring the Digital Commons Network

Search wheel for exploring the Digital Commons Network

The collection is made available through Berkeley Electronic Press (bepress.com).

This stupendous resource was featured in the Digital Shift – Uncommonly Open: The New Digital Commons Network (June 19, 2013)

This resource was reviewed in the BestBizWeb newsletter.

Reference Works Online

An reference work that is online may not be what you expect based on the print version: There may be issues of authority, ease of use, incompleteness, and even the reader’s privacy. This article points you to the weaknesses to watch for and areas of improvement.

The Ebb and Flow of Reference Products , By Denise Beaubien Bennett, Online Searcher, July/August 2014 Issue

Of interest:

New items available and, more importantly, findable online include items formerly known as “grey literature” or “vertical file” material from organizations and associations, such as local brochures, statistical reports, and policy papers.